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Ek Bangalir Rannaghaur Theke(From a Bengali’s Kitchen)

Archive for the ‘Side dish’ Category

Dal Sukhno/ Dried Masur Dal

Posted by Sudeshna on June 12, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

I have found that Masur dal post on my blog has become the most popular post. In most Bengali households masur or red lentil is the most important of all pulses served. Whenever there is some left out masur dal in the refrigerator my mom always makes the Sukhno dal (Bengali for dried pulses), though it can be prepared with fresh masur dal also. It is a best accompaniment of warm rice served at first of the meal. This preparation had been one of my favorite dishes in lunch. Its simple to cook and absolutely yummy.

dal sukhno 2

Ingredients:

Masur dal (Red lentil): ½ cup

Onions (Peyaj): 2 medium sizes

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Green chili (Kancha lanka): 2

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 2 tablespoon

Salt to taste and 3 cups of water

Preparation:

  • Wash the masur dal well and cook as instructed here
  • Simmer the dal for further 5 -6 minutes so that the dal gets absolutely dried up
  • Serve with freshly chopped onions and mustard oil

dal sukhno 1

My tip: While simmering the dal to dry, constantly stir it so that it doesn’t get stick to the bottom of the vessel.

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Macher Dimer Vada

Posted by Sudeshna on June 5, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

In most species of fish, when the fish bears eggs the taste of its flesh reduces, excepting for hilsa. Hilsa’s taste gets enhanced when it bears egg. There is a reason behind this. Hilsa comes to the sweet water, that is, it comes up to the river during monsoon, the egg laying season. The sweet water happens to have an effect on the taste and so the catch from the river is world renowned. Now, coming back to the other fishes; rohu looses its taste during the laying season. Anyways the preparations made out of the eggs are ecstatic.

Fish egg, what we generally call is not only the eggs themselves but it also contains parts of the matured ovaries of the fish, and is called roe. Roe is prepared in different ways in different parts of the world. It is widely used in Asia and Europe. While we Indians mainly fry the roe, people from Japan, Korea and parts of Asia like to have it raw as a side dish with rice. Roe is widely used as a topping over sushi. Roe is also seasoned with salt, lemon, onions, olive oils and pepper powder. In Greece it’s used as a dip. While roe from shrimp, cod, salmon, sea urchin, and many other kinds of fishes are used in preparation, I have used roe from rohu for this preparation.

Ingredients:

Rohu roe (Rui macher dim): 100gms, properly cleaned

Wheat Flour (Maida): 1 tablespoon

Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium size

Green chilies (Kancha lanka): 2

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 1 teaspoon

Rice (Chal): 1 teaspoon

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Sunflower oil (Sada tel): for deep frying

Preparation:

  • Chop the onions finely and mix with the mustard oil, keep for 5 minutes for the onions to soften
  • Add all the ingredients excepting the sunflower oil to the softened onions and mix well. If required add little more flour to make the mixture firm
  • Make small flattened balls of the mixture
  • Heat oil in a wok or frying pan and deep fry the balls till cooked properly. Try putting a fork through the balls; if it comes out clean, the vada is fried.
  • Take out of flame and place on a kitchen paper to soak out the excess oil
  • Serve with tomato sauce and onions or also use it as an accompaniment with rice and dal.

Macher Dimer Vada

My note: Macher dimer  vada tastes best when consumed hot, so prepare it just before eating.

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Posted in Dinner, Egg, fish, Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Alu posto/ Potato in poppy seed paste

Posted by Sudeshna on April 26, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

Poppy seed is an integral part of the platter in all Bengali households. Preparations with poppy seeds mainly include vegan dishes, but there are also some dishes where poppy seeds are used with fish or meat. The love for poppy seeds among Bengalis started hundreds of years ago. Alu posto is the most common form of poppy seeds use in Bengali cuisine, at times the potatoes are also replaced with ridge gourds, onions, aubergine, or even chicken.

The herbal concoction of the seeds is also beneficial in treating all kinds of nervous disorders. Apart from consuming poppy seeds in its raw form or toasted on bagels and sweet breads, a paste made from the seeds can be used as a poultice in obtaining relief from swellings and joint pains.  Finely ground powder made from poppy seeds can also be consumed to treat insomnia and diarrhea. Apart from adding flavor to food, poppy fields also present an added advantage of providing health benefits to the human body. It also supplies essential enzymes and fatty acids as a form of nutrition. In ancient days, athletes would consume or blend of poppy seeds with honey entwined to ensure strength and good health. The oil derived from poppy seeds is used in various cosmetic preparations for the head and skin as balms and conditioners.

sheel-nora

Ingredients:

Potato (Alu): 4 medium sizes

Poppy seeds (Posto): 3 tablespoons

Nigella seeds (Kalo jeera): 1 teaspoon

Green chili (kancha lanka): 3

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 1 tablespoon

Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Make a soft fine paste of the poppy seeds and keep aside
  • Cut the potatoes into small square pieces
  • Heat oil in a wok over low flame, add the nigella seeds
  • Throw in the potatoes along with the turmeric powder, green chilies and salt
  • Pour in about a cup of water and let the potatoes get half cooked
  • Add the poppy seed paste and cook till the potatoes are well cooked
  • Pour in water if necessary

alu-posto

Take out of flame and serve with rice or chapattis.

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), potato, Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Kach Kalar Kofta/ Raw Banana Curry

Posted by Sudeshna on April 13, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

Too much of work pressure these few days, so just thought of posting this recipe without writing long sentences. Cook it and enjoy it.

Ingredients:

Raw Banana (Kacha kala): 2

Potato (Alu): 2

Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium size

Bay leaf (Tej pata): 2

Cumin seeds (Jeera): ½ teaspoon

Cumin powder (Jeera guro): ½ teaspoon

Chili powder (Sukhno lankar guro): ½ teaspoon

Ginger paste (Ada bata): 1 teaspoon

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Garam masala powder: 2 pinches

Clarified butter (Ghee): ½ teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 2 tablespoon

Green chili (Kacha lanka): 2, chopped into small pieces

Corn flour: 2 tablespoon

kalar_kofta_1

Preparation:

  • Boil the raw banana and one potato with a pinch of salt
  • Chop the onion into small pieces
  • Peel off the bananas and the potato, and mash well with a pinch of salt and turmeric, green chilies, ½ teaspoon ginger paste and corn flour
  • Make small balls of one-inch diameter with the mashed mass
  • Heat oil in a wok and fry the banana balls till golden brown, keep aside

kalar_kofta_2

  • Cut the potatoes into eight pieces and fry for 4 – 5 minutes, keep aside
  • Add the cumin seeds, bay leaves and sauté in the heated oil
  • Throw in the half fried potatoes, ginger paste, chili, cumin and turmeric powder; pour in one cup of water
  • Cook till the potatoes are cooked well
  • Drop in the fried balls, add the garam masala and clarified butter
  • Take out of flame after a minute

kalar_kofta_3

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Harvest: The Festival of Rice: Roundup Part II

Posted by Sudeshna on March 1, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

With many types of rice, it really took me long to come up with the round-up. I would like to thank Hema and Easy to Cook for sending so many recipes for the event. Please let me know if I have missed out any of your recipes. You can see the first part of roundup for this event here.  SGD of  Whims and Wishes also wrote some words about this Harvest festival, and she was very kind to share her thoughts with us.

harvest-the-festival-of-rice

  1. Bajji’s Platter from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  2. Bisi Bela Bhaat from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  3. Bisibelabath from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  4. Black-eyed peas pulao from Asha of Aroma Hope
  5. Brinjal Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  6. Capsicum Rice from Shama  of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  7. Carrot Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  8. Cauliflower Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  9. Chenna Pulao from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  10. Chicken biriyani from Shama of Easy to Cook Recipes
  11. Chilli-Tangerine rice from Anushreeram of Chandrabhaga
  12. Cilantro Rice from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  13. Cocnut Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  14. Coconut Milk Vegetable Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  15. Dil se pulao from Sindhura of Bay Leaf
  16. Doodh Puli Peethe from Sunanda of Sunanda’s Kitchen
  17. Garlic Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  18. Healthy Geen Rice/ Pudina Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  19. Iyengar’s Poliodharai from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  20. Keshari Bhaat (Sweet Saffron Rice) from Sanika of  Sanika’s Spicy&Tangy….Sweet&Yummy!!!!
  21. Khasta Kachori from Naveeta of Zaayeka
  22. Kondakadalai Sadam/ Red Chana Dal Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  23. Lemon Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook  Recipes
  24. Lemony Lemon – A Tangy Tasty Masala Bath from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  25. Medhu Pakora from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  26. Mint Magic (Pudina pulao) from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  27. Mishti Pulao from Aundhuti of Gourmet Affair
  28. Mor Koozh from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  29. Multiprotein Rice from Shama of Easy to Cook  Recipes
  30. Mushroom Pulao from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  31. Paruppu Keerai Dosai from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  32. Pasta Pulao from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  33. Patishapta from SGD of  Whims and Wishes
  34. Peanut Cup Rice from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  35. Poha from EC of  Easy Crafts
  36. Prawn/Shrimp Pulao of Homecooked
  37. Puliyothaai/ Tamarind Rice from Shama of  Easy to Cook Recipes
  38. Puttu~Steamed Rice Cakes from Poornima of Tasty Treats
  39. Rice Ball Kheer from Sanika of Sanika’s Spicy&Tangy….Sweet&Yummy!!!!
  40. Rice Uppma from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  41. Sharkara Payasam from Poornima of Tasty Treats
  42. Shazani biryani from Sindhura of Bay Leaf
  43. Spongy Dosa with yum yum coconut from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  44. Tomato rice from Sindhura of Bay Leaf
  45. Vegetable Bonda from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  46. Vegetable Pulao from Poornima of  Tasty Treats
  47. Vegetable Rice from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  48. Venpongal from Shama of Easy to Cook Recipes
  49. Wholesome Moong kichadi from EC of Easy Crafts

With so many recipes, it’s really hard to choose which one is the best. But still, it’s on you to select the best. So go ahead and choose your best recipe and write it down as a comment for this post.

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Posted in Chicken, Desserts, event, More to rice, Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish, snacks | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments »

Harvest: The festival of Rice: Round up Part I

Posted by Sudeshna on February 16, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

I am so sorry that I was not able to post the round up for the event. Thanks to all for sending me those wonderful recipes and also for being patient. Everyday of the last month I got so many mails for the event. All the mails had so many different kinds of recipe. To tell you the truth the first time when the idea of this event struck I was not at all aware that I’ll get so many different types of recipes with rice or rice flour as the main ingredient. This is really unbelievable.

Here goes the first part of the round up for Harvest:  The Festival of Rice

harvest-the-festival-of-rice

  1. Ambur Mutton biriyani from Ashwini of Ashwini’s spicy cuisine
  2. Bengal Royal Rice from Anushriram of Chandrabhaga
  3. Brown Basmati Egg Biriyani with Chickpeas from Anuvidya of And a little bit more
  4. Cheppi Surnalli from Namrata Kini of Welcome to Namu’s Kitchen
  5. Chicken Dum Biriyani from Dershana of The Footloose Chef
  6. Chicken Rice from Priya Sriram of Priya’s Sourashtrian Kitchen
  7. Chilli-Tangerine rice from Anushriram of Chandrabhaga
  8. Chinese fried rice from Dhanya of My Home Cooking
  9. Coriander Rice from Ashwini of Ashwini’s spicy cuisine
  10. Curd rice from Deepa Hari of Simple Home Cooking – from Deepa’s Kitchen
  11. Kadambam Rice from DK of Culinary Bazaar
  12. Lemon Rice from Ramya of Mane Adige
  13. Minced Chicken Pulao from Poornima Nair of Tasty Treats
  14. Mixed Vegetable Khichdi from Usha of Veg Inspirations
  15. Paal Pongal from Rajee of Simply Innocence
  16. Pakistani Chicken Biriyani from swapna Pravin of  Cooking with Swapna
  17. Pongal from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  18. Pongal, vadai and a tooth from Sunshinemom of Tongue Ticklers
  19. Puli Sundal from Chitra of Ratatouille – Any one can cook
  20. Recipe for Stuffed Baked Acorn Squash from Vnv of Veggie Monologues
  21. Rice Dosa and  Koozh of Chitra from Ratatouille – any one can cook
  22. Sakkarai Pongal from Priya Suresh of Priya’s Easy N Tasty Recipes
  23. Schezeun Fried Rice from Poonam of Poonam’s Kitchen
  24. Tacos with Kidney beans, salsa and rice from Arch of The Yum Factor
  25. Tehari from Notyet100 of Asankhana
  26. Tondli Bhat from Usha of Enjoy Indian Food
  27. Undi (Steamed Rice Balls) from Namrata Kini of Welcome to Namu’s Kitchen
  28. Veg Dhum Biriyani from Hema of Adlak’s Kitchen
  29. Venn Pongal and Chakkarai Pongal from Smita Kulkarni of Dabbu’s Recipes
  30. Zucchini rice from Anushriram of Chandrabhaga

Go ahead and comment on your most loved recipes. I would love to know about your comments.

Check out the other parts of the round up, till then Happy Cooking and happy Eating .

signature

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Posted in Chicken, Dinner, event, More to rice, Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish, snacks, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments »

Chichingar Tarkari/Snake Gourd Curry

Posted by Sudeshna on January 23, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

Snake gourd to me is a very peculiar type of vegetable. Its white and green stripes and more than 2 feet in length, it really looks quite similar to the reptile from which it has taken its name.

Flickr)

Snake gourds on sale (Courtesy: Flickr)

Serves 2

Ingredients:

Chichingha (Snake gourd):  200gms

Peyaj(Onion): 1 medium, fiely chopped lengthwise

Ginger paste (Ada bata): 1/2 teaspoon

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): 1/4 teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 1 tablespoon

Kancha Lanka (Green chilli): 1

chichingha_raw

Preparation:

  • Cut the snake gourd lengthwise into two equal halves.
  • Chop the halves into thin semi circles and remove the seeds if any.
  • Heat the oil in a wok
  • As the oil becomes piping hot throw in the onions, saute for 30 seconds
  • Add ginger paste, turmeric powder and season with salt.
  • Toss a few times so that the spices get mixed with the vegetable
  • As the vegetables start drying add 1/2 a cup of water and cook for 5 minutes under cover
  • Remove the lid and add water if necessary within those 5 minutes
  • When the snake gour becomes tender take it out of flame

chichingha_cooked

Snake gourd curry is a good side dish for rice and roti both. The cooking time may vary depending on the age of the vegetable.

Look for more updates here till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Palak in Paneer Bowl

Posted by Sudeshna on January 7, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

So the guessing game was fun. Thank you all for the comments. Yes, you all have guessed it right the main ingredients were paneer (famer’s cheese) and spinach. Here goes the recipe for the yummy and delicious recipe from my mom’s kitchen.

paneer_palak2

Serves 6

Ingredients:

For making the paneer bowls:-

Farmer’s cheese (Paneer): ½ kg

Wheat flour (Maida): ½ cup

Spinach paste (Palak shaakh bata): 1 large bowl

Garlic (Rasun): 10 -12 cloves, chopped finely

Ginger paste (Ada bata): 1 teaspoon

Sugar (Chini): ½ teaspoon

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Chilli powder (Sukhno lanka guro): 1 teaspoon

Sunflower oil (Sada tel): 5 tablespoons for frying

Salt to taste

For making the gravy:-

Cashew nuts (Kaju badam): 30 gms

Poppy seeds (Posto): 100 gms

Green cardamom (Choto elaichi): 3-4

Cinnamon (Darchini): One 1″ size

Cloves (Labango): 3-4

Green chili (Kanch LAnka): 3 – 4

Sunflower oil (Sada tel): 1 tablespoon

Preparation:

For making the paneer bowls:-

  • Take the paneer, wheat flour and salt in a large bowl and knead well to make dough. The dough shouldn’t be very soft, depending on the water content of the farmer’s cheese.
  • Make two inch diameter spheres from the dough
  • Using your hand make them into small bowls to hold the spinach
  • Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a wok
  • As the oil becomes piping hot sauté the onions in it
  • Throw in the chopped garlic and ginger paste just as the onions turn golden
  • Add the spinach paste when the oil starts separating from the sautéed spices
  • Put in the turmeric and chili powder along with salt and sugar
  • Fry till the spinach gets dry
  • Take it out of flame and let it cool down completely
  • Take a large tablespoon of the fried spinach paste and put it into the paneer bowls
  • Heat oil in a frying pan and fry the fried spinach paste filled paneer bowls in batches
  • Drain the excess oil using a kitchen paper

paneer_palak_fry

The fried bowls are an ideal snack for any evening party, or you can even use it as a starter along with tomato sauce. Read on if you want to make it into a curry.

For the curry:-

  • In a mixer grinder put in cashew nuts, poppy seeds, green chilies and ½ cup of water, make it into a smooth paste
  • Heat oil in a wok and throw in cinnamon, cardamom and cloves
  • As they start popping pour in the poppy paste along with salt and sauté till the oil starts leaving
  • Carefully add the fried farmer’s cheese bowls to the gravy and cook uncovered for 5 minutes
  • Take out from flame and serve with rice, paratha or roti

paneer_palak_curry2

This dish was a instant hit among all my relatives when my mom cooked it for the first time. Though a little tedious and take almost 1 hour to prepare from the raw materials to the dining table, but the outcome is worth all these hard work. Look for more recipe here, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating .

Also this recipe is heading for the EFM-Savouries hosted by Srilekha.

savouries-logo1

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Posted in Dinner, Side dish, snacks | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments »

Guess What!!!!

Posted by Sudeshna on January 6, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

guess1

Hello to all my visitors. Today I am in a jolly mood, and so thought of having some fun with all  my visitors. A couple of days back, my mom cooked up something and sent the pics to me. The pics courtesy my little sister, this she told me to specifically mention on my post when I upload the photos.

There was coterie at my home in Kolkata and so mom prepared this. The review that I got from all those who attended the party, was that the preparation was very innovative and very very delicious.

The task for you today is to guess what actually is the dish made of. There are two main ingredients in the preparation and it is purely vegetarian dish.

So put on your thinking caps and start tickling your imagination. I’ll put up the recipe tomorrow. Till then keep guessing.

No more thing, for those who guess it correctly there aren’t prizes to win. It is only to understand yourself how well you can imagine and distinguish the ingredients in your fridge and kitchen.

guess 2

All the best.

Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

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Posted in Dinner, Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish, snacks | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 12 Comments »

Masur Dal/Red Lentil Recipe

Posted by Sudeshna on January 5, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

Legumes are a very important part of our meals. In my family, I have seen my mom cook dal for every meal. Be it an accompaniment for paratha, roti or rice, dal is always there. Among the all types of legumes found in the market, the one that is very popular in my family is the masyr dal, that too it is cooked in a very simple but special way. It tastes so good.

Masur dal is a lentil which is also a part of the  legume family. Lentils have a very high percentage of  proteins, and also essential amino acids like isoleucine and lysine. But, they lack in the other two essential amino acids, viz.,  methionine and cystine. Iron which is an important source of nutrition is present in high quantities in lentils and is adviced for pregnant ladies, adolescents or those who suffere from iron deficiency.

Serves 4

Ingredients:

Red lentil (Masur dal): 1 small bowl

Onion (Peyaj): 1 small, finely chopped

Green chili (Kancha Lanka) : 1 or 2, chopped

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ¼ teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 1 teapoon

Water : 2 cups

Salt to taste

Preparation:

•·        In a pan pour in the water and masur dal with the salt and put to boil

  • Let it boil for 10 to 12 minutes, add water if necessary
  • Heat the oil in a wok and sauté the onions
  • Pour in the now boiled dal
  • Add turmeric powder and green chilies and stir so that the turmeric powder gets mixed well
  • Bring to boil and let it remain for 2 to 3 minutes, then take out of flame

dal

Masur dal tastes good with naything, so just try it with anything you want. Check for more updates here, till then .Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

I am sending this post as a second entry to My Legume Love Affair, Seventh Helping! hosted by Srivalli, the event actually is the brain child of Well-Seasoned Cook Susan.

mlla7logo

Also sending the recipe to Sara for her Weekend Cookbook Challenge: 36

The post on way to the FIC-January event hosted by Sunshinemom, the color of the event being Yellow this month.

fic-yellow

Also sending it to Ramki’s  “Recipes for the rest of us” .

recipes_for_the_rest_of_us

My fiancee is in love with this dal, he just licks his fingers whenever I cook it, so here it goes for the lovely event, Just for you hosted by Alka.

justforyou

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Posted in Dinner, Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

Dimer Tarkari/ Egg Curry

Posted by Sudeshna on January 3, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

I wish all of you have a great vacation, and the New Year brought more joy to all your lives.

Here in India the only two of vacation in winter are Christmas and New Year, and so there is no bypassing the daily routines. Each night I think of the easiest ways of cooking things. Last night, it was the turn of eggs to be cooked in an easy but tasty way.

Serves 4

Ingredients:

Eggs (Dim): 4

Potato (Alu): 2 medium sizes , cut into quarters

Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium size, chopped finely

Ginger- garlic paste (Ada-rasun bata): ½ teaspoon

Garlic (Rasun): 3-4 cloves

Garam Masala: ½ teaspoon

Chili powder (Sukhno lankar guro): ¾ teaspoon

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 1 tablespoon

Preparation:

  • Boil the potatoes and eggs for 10 to 12 minutes, or till the eggs are hard boiled
  • As the eggs are boiled, take out the shells and keep aside
  • In a wok heat half of the oil and fry the eggs and potatoes separately. Do not over fry, just fry till a golden layer is formed over the eggs and potatoes. Keep aside
  • Pour in the rest of the oil in the wok, and sauté the onions
  • Throw in the garlic cloves and ginger garlic paste to the sautéed onions and fry for 1 minute over medium flame
  • Add the spices excepting garam masala and fry for half a minute more
  • Pour in 1 cup of water, or if you want more gravy then pour more
  • Let the curry gets cooked and thickened
  • When the curry is of your wanted consistency carefully drop the eggs and cook for 2 to 3 minutes
  • Sprinkle the garam masala and take it out of flame

dimer-tarkari

Egg curry goes well with rice, paratha or roti. So, have it as a side with anything of your choice.

I love the smell of mustard oil, and so use it for making curries, those of you who don’t like it can also try preparing with sunflower or vegetable, in that case any oil of your choice.

Check for more updates here, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating .

Sending the recipe to Original Recipes – Monthly Round-Up Event hosted by Culinarty.

Also this recipe is heading for the EFM-Savouries hosted by Srilekha.

savouries-logo

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Posted in Dinner, Egg, Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Roadside Tadka

Posted by Sudeshna on January 2, 2009

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

I have posted this recipe before but its for Srivalli that I am posting it once more to participate in the event hosted by her.

Serves 2

Ingredients:

Green Mugh dal: 150gms

Tomato: 2 medium sizes

Onion (Peyaj): 2 large ones

Garlic (Rasun): 7 or 8 cloves

Kasturi Methi (Fenugreek leaves): 1 tablespoon

Green chili (Sukhno Lanka): 3

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): 1 teaspoon

Sunflower Oil (Saada tel): 2 tablespoons

Salt to taste

The Ingredients

The Ingredients

Preparation:

  • Soak the mugh dal for about an hour.
  • Pressure cook for at 2 to 3 whistles.
  • Drain the excess water out of the dal and keep aside.
  • Cut the onions in square pieces, and the chilies into small ringlets.
  • Heat the oil in a shallow wok.
  • As the oil gets heated throw in the onions to sauté along with the garlic.
  • As the onions become tender, add tomatoes and chili, sauté for 2 more minutes.
  • Add the mugh dal, turmeric powder, salt and toss well.
  • Add little water if necessary and in between mash the dal properly.
  • Now add the Kasturi Methi to the preparation and mix well.
  • Scramble to eggs in a separate frying pan with little salt and throw in to the Tarka preparation.
  • Take it out of flame as it gets dried up.
Tarka with roti, curd and onion

Tarka with roti, curd and onion

It tastes best with roti or paratha and a little bit of curd and onions. You can add chicken or mutton keema, or anything of your choice. Tarka also tastes good without adding any other non-vegetarian items to it. So, you can have it without any other supplementary to it. Catch you soon, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

Sending my recipe to Srivalli’s Announcing My Legume Love Affair, Seventh Helping! , the event brain child of Well-Seasoned Cook Susan .

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Posted in Dinner, Egg, Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Mochar Tarkari/Banana Flower

Posted by Sudeshna on December 14, 2008

Banana is one of those plants which can be used in various different ways. From its stem to the flowers and the fruits to the leaves everything is in use. Banana flower, what we call mocha in my mother tongue, Bengali is a delicacy to have. It is prepared in different ways, using various ingredients.

After coming to Bangalore I had never seen banana flowers sold in the market. The last time when I went to my nearby supermarket, there was a whole rack of banana flowers being sold. I just couldn’t help myself and brought one of them back home. My mom cooks it in many ways. I started thinking of which one would be most simple and easy to cook. She puts in gram seeds (chola), even small pakoras made of lentils. But due to lack of time, I cooked it with potato and nothing else. As you all know Bengalis just can’t live without potatoes, so that was a simple choice for me.

The preparation turned out petty well and all my friends who came home that day had only one thing to say, “You made me remember my mom”. I remembered watching Ratatouille, when the food critic too remembered his mom having had the dish. That is always the best part of cooking an authentic dish from Bengal.

Banana Flower - a potrait

Banana Flower - a potrait

Serves 4

Ingredients:

Banana Flower (Mocha): 1 medium size

Potato (Alu): 2 medium sizes

Turmeric Powder (Halud Guro): ½ teaspoon

Chili Powder (Lanka Guro): 1 teaspoon

Cumin Powder (Jeera Guro): 1 teaspoon

Garam Masala Powder: ½ teaspoon

Clarified Butter (Ghee): 1 teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser Tel): 1 tablespoon

Preparation:

  • Take out each flower from the inflorescence and cut off the anther from it.
  • Chop the flowers very finely
  • Put all the chopped flowers in a deep pan and pour in water till it is fully under water
  • Get it to boil and drain of the water, keep the chopped flowers aside.
  • Heat the oil in a wok and fry the potatoes till tender. Take out the potatoes and keep separately.
  • To the left over oil add the spices except ghee and garam masala, fry for 30 seconds.
  • Throw in the boiled flowers and mix the spices well with it.
  • Add the potatoes and pour in some water for the vegetables to get cooked constantly.
  • Simmer the flame and stir it often so that it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan.
  • Add extra water if it is not cooked properly
  • Just before taking it out of the flame sprinkle garam masala powder and ghee; mix well.

mocha

You can add some soaked gram seeds, frying them along with the potatoes, also pakoras made of lentils is a good addition to this preparation. Click on pakoras to know how to make them. Mochar tarkari tastes best with steamed rice.

Look for more update on this blog, till the Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

Sending this to Lore’s Original Recipes – Monthly Round-Up Event.

original-recipe

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), potato, Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Begun Bhaja/ Aubergine fry

Posted by Sudeshna on December 7, 2008

Brinjal – aubergine – egg plant, whatever you call it, it tastes the same. I remember those nights when mom used to fry aubergine. The smell loomed over the whole household. Aubergine fry or begun bhaja is one of my favorites. I love them with roti.

Yesterday when I went to the nearby supermarket, I saw a big placard hanging on top of the aubergine basket. It was a whole list of the nutrient contents of aubergine. I am not sure though that those nutrient value retains after deep frying. Navita had written a post on aubergine fry, you cannot fry aubergine in a different style but I have one ingredient more to let the aubergine absorb less oil.

begun-roti

Serves 4

Ingredients:

Aubergine (Begun): 1 medium size

Turmeric powder (Halud Guro): ¼ teaspoon

Sugar (Chini): ¼ teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser Tel) for deep frying

Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Cut the aubergine in 2 inches width circles
  • Put spices over the cut aubergine pieces
  • Heat oil in a deep frying pan , when fumes comes out of the oil fry the egg plants

begun-bhaja

Aubergine absorbs too much oil while frying, so it is best to wrap them with blotting paper before serving. It’s my mom’s tip to put little sugar which also helps the aubergine to absorb less oil.

Check for more updates here, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

Begun Morichut

Posted by Sudeshna on November 30, 2008

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

This is my fiftieth post here on this blog. I thank all my blog visitors for giving me the courage and inspiration to go ahead and write new posts on my blog, and most of all I thank my parents and sister. My mom who taught me to love the art of cooking, and my father though never enters the kitchen always find it tempting to know whats cooking on my blog. My little sister who is always busy taking photographs of every step and every ,eal I cook, when I am at home in Kolkata.

To mark this happy event for me, I have prepared  a typical dish which hails from Chittagong in Bangaladesh‘. Now, this is a bit tricky, why should I be cooking something that sounds and tastes like a typical Bangladeshi dish. The answer is simple, my grandfathers, both from my father’s as well as from my mother’s sides were inhabitants of then unpartitioned Bengal. After the partition in 1947, they came and settled in Kolkata. As everybody say you can take out the Bengali from Bengal, but not the Bengal from the Bengali, so was it. At home our cooking style resembles those of the people of Bangladesh, though I am the third generation who is living in India and never had a luck to see the place where my grandparents were born and lived the best days of their lives.

Morichut is a typical naming for any curry in their native language of Chittagong. I love this one with eggs and aubergines. Morichut also can be made using potatoes. May be I’ll write a post on that sometime later.

Serves 2

Ingredients:

Aubergine (Choto Begun): 200gms

Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium size

Eggs (Dim): 2

Mustard Oil (Sarser Tel): ½ teaspoon

Turmeric Powder (Halud Guro): ½ teaspoon

Green Chili (Kacha Lanka): 1 or 2

Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Heat oil in a shallow wok
  • Add the onions to sauté as the oil gets heated
  • Toss in the aubergine cut into small square shaped pieces and fry till they are partly cooked
  • Add salt, turmeric and the green chili
  • Keep aside the half cooked egg plants, and heat 1 teaspoon of oil and add the eggs.
  • Scramble the eggs and add it to the half cooked aubergine
  • Cook till the aubergine gets cooked

begun-morichut

It tastes good with roti, paratha or even rice. So cook it and have with anything you like.

Look for more update on this blog, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating .

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Posted in Egg, Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Kumro Alur Tarkari

Posted by Sudeshna on November 20, 2008

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

Bengalis have a tendency of putting potato in any kind of recipe. It feels as if potatoes are an integral part of all the recipes. You can guess from the average health of all Bengalis, barring some exceptions, generally every Bengali signifies that potato look, a little more fats here and there. I too am not an exception. I like to add potatoes in different curries, though because of peer pressure the quantity has reduced with the passage of time.

Everyday after coming back from office, it’s always a pain staking job to think what to cook for dinner. Last night I was only left out with a piece of pumpkin and some potatoes. In my flat I don’t have a mixer grinder so couldn’t think of experimenting any other curries with that pumpkin. I took to cooking a simple potato pumpkin curry.

This preparation uses a masala that is a widely used spice in Bengali cuisine. As the name suggests (“Five Spices”), panch phoron is a combination of 5 spices, namely mustard seeds (sarse), fennel (mouri), nigella (kalo jeera), cumin (jeera) and fenugreek seeds (methi), you canknow more at Wiki.

kumror-tarkari-panch-phoron

Serves 2

Ingredients:

  • Pumpkin (Kumro): 100gms
  • Potato (Alu): 2 medium sizes
  • Onion (Peyaj): 1 small
  • Green chili (Kacha Lanka): 2
  • Turmeric powder (Halud Guro): ½ teaspoon
  • Mustard oil (Sarser Tel): 1 teaspoon
  • Salt to taste

kumror-tarkari-ingredients

Preparation:

  • Heat the oil in a wok
  • Sauté the onions in the heated oil and throw in the panch phoron
  • Stir for 30 seconds before adding the vegetables
  • Put in turmeric powder, salt and the chilies
  • Stir for 2 -3 minutes, and add ½ cup of water for the vegetables to get cooked properly
  • As the vegetables get cooked properly, take out from flame and serve with roti, paratha or rice

kumror-tarkari-ready1

Check for more updates on this blog, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), potato, Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

String beans with Potato Curry

Posted by Sudeshna on November 19, 2008

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

I have just joined Glaxo SmithKline Ltd for my Post Graduate internship. I have become so busy with the work that I couldn’t even think about writing a post for my blog. Yesterday I got a scrap from a school friend. She is presently staying in Bangladesh and as she says there are very few options for any vegan dishes. She requested me to write about some vegetarian dishes for her.

I just could not leave out her request and so thought of posting this dish for her.

Serves 4

Ingredients:

String beans (Barboti): 100gms

Potato (Aalu): 4 medium sizes

Nigella seeds(Kalo jeera): ½ teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser Tel): 1 teaspoon

Turmeric Powder (Halud Guro): ½ teaspoon

Green Chili (Kancha Lanka): 2

Preparation:

  • Slice the strings beans into one inch sizes and the potato into small square pieces
  • Take oil in a wok and let it heat
  • Throw in the nigella seeds as the oil gets heated
  • Add the potatoes and strings beans along with the turmeric powder and salt
  • Toss the vegetables for a minute so that the oil and spices get mixed
  • Fry for 2-3 minutes
  • Pour in 1 cup of water and let it cook with stirring twice or thrice
  • As the vegetables get cooked take out of flame

100_3942

Serve with roti, paratha or with steamed rice. It tastes good with anything. Check for more updates here on this blog, till then Happy Cooking, Happy Eating.

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), potato, Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Masur Dal and Alu Posto: A whole lunch

Posted by Sudeshna on November 6, 2008

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

Posto or poppy seeds is always a delicacy in all Bengali household. It is extensively used as a spice in various dishes, be that in potato or chicken curry.It is said that poppy makes you feel cool, I am not sure of this saying though. I mom believes in it and so come summer there has to be some kind of a curry consisting of poppy seeds. The range varies from simple poppy seed paste sauted to poppy seed grind with cashew to make chicken curry.

As with poppy seeds, masur dal also takes up a very important place in Bengali kitchens. whenever I taste masur dal, I go down memory lane. every day when I came back from school for lunch, mom always prepared masur dal, my all time favorite among all lentils.  Even till now, when I go home in my vacations mom always cook masur dal for me.

All this I was telling because I had the best combination of veggie delight last night. It was steamed rice with masur dal and alu posto. If you are a Bengali or if you are not, then ask any Bengali , you’ll come to know that anyone would kill for this platter.

Serves 2

Ingredients:

For Alu Posto:-

Potato (Alu): 3 large size

Nigella seeds (Kalonji): 1 teaspoon

Poppy seeds (Posto): 2 tablespoons

Green Chili (Kacha Lanka): 2

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 1 teaspoon

For Masur dal:-

Masur dal: 50 gms

Onions (Peyaj): 2 small sizes

Green chili (Kacha lanka): 2

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 1 teaspoon

Cilantro leaves (Dhaniya pata): 2 tablespoon of chopped leaves (optional)

chopped-coriander

Preparation:

Alu Posto:-

  • Grind the poppy seeds and green chili in a grinder to make a paste
  • Cut the potatoes into small one inch squares
  • Heat oil in a wok, and throw in the nigella seeds as the oil gets heated.
  • Immediately add the potatoes and toss for a while so that the oil gets mixed with the potatoes.
  • Now add turmeric and salt along with a cup of water and let the potatoes get half cooked.
  • Put in the poppy seed paste and stir so that the paste gets mixed with the half cooked potatoes. You can add more water if the curry gets dried up.
  • Cook till the potatoes get cooked properly and the water disappears.
Potato in poppy seed paste

Potato in poppy seed paste

Here is a slide show to show the stages of the cooking:

Masur Dal:-

  • Thoroughly wash the dal and put in a deep pan with salt and water so that the dal remain almost 3 inches under water. Let it boil till the water and dal becomes inseparable.
  • In a separate heat the oil and throw in the onions and green chili. Saute till the onions turn golden brown
  • Add the sauted onions to the boiled dal along with the turmeric powder and cook for two to three minutes more.
  • Garnish with chopped coriander leaves.
Masur Dal

Masur Dal

Masur dal and poppy-potato curry tastes best with steamed rice, but you can also try it with chapatis and rotis. The curry also looks good without turmeric, so you can try out that too. About masur dal, it depends what concentration you want for it, depending on that you can keep the water or make it dry.

the-platter

Sending this to Challenge Event hosted by Veda of Iyengar’s kitchen

presentation11

Check for more updates here on this blog, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), potato, Side dish, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Potato-Okra Fry

Posted by Sudeshna on November 5, 2008

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

When I was a child my hobby was to paint and dance. As I grew up and stepped into my adolescence dance turned from a hobby to a passion. I had performed in various festivals, stage shows, TV shows, school and college fests. Painting was no more a hobby, but I still draw at times, just to feel happy. I left Kolkata almost a year and a half back. Leaving Kolkata had a great toll on me, I had to leave out my dance session, which I had been attending for the last 20 years. The last time I danced on stage was back in winter 2006.

But there was another hobby which was in its nascent stage some two years back and for which I spend a good percentage of my monthly money these days. This hobby started even before I became a full time cook in my kitchen (here to note, I still don’t have what I can call my own kitchen, but still need to be satisfied with the small kitchen in my rented apartment) and a food blogger. Coming back to my new but not so new hobby, collecting cook books. I have a plethora of these cook books now. From Sanjeev Kapoor to Tarla Dalal and Roz Denny to old worn out books of multiple authors; books written in English and also in Bengali, my mother tongue. Every year I used to visit Kolkata Book Fair and my task was to search for the most recent and the oldest cook books being sold. I have bought books of well known publishers like Duncan Baird Publishers (London), Popular Prakashan (Mumbai) and also from the not so known publishers. Now that I am away from Kolkata, the annual book fair is almost out of question to visit, so I visit all the book stalls here in Bangalore and peek into the culinary sections of these stores. I have got books starting from INR 10 to few that were quite a burden to my wallet. Of all these books that I bought, the one that I felt very happy in buying was “The Big Book of Great British Recipes“. This book has got 365 delicious and treasured recipes, as the book cover says. But the reason of my being happy in buying this book was something different. The book is sold at 625 INR in India, but the copy I have had cost me only 50 INR because of a little tear on its cover. It was like getting a treasure for almost nothing. The book is really great. Another book in line is written in Bengali, which my mom gifted. It has a whopping collection of 1001 recipes from East Bengal (presently Bangladesh) and West Bengal (eastern state in India, where I hail from). I treasure my books above everything, and whenever I am alone and have got nothing to do I just go through them. It brings me immense pleasure to see the colorful photographs and the passion the cook has put in to prepare those dishes. Though I have not tried much of the recipes from these books, but they have made me realize the basic difference in the different styles of cooking. Books from professional cooks have the exact amount of the ingredients and the time of cooking mentioned in every recipe and also a note from the cook as a recommendation from him or her to make the dish taste better. Another very important aspect of all cook books is the photograph they feature. Though the cheap books have very few or no photos of the cooked food, the not so cheap books have a whacking number of food photographs in them. It is a general tendency I have noticed in me, to read those recipes having photographs, I think you will also agree to that.

cook-books

That was a lot of writing from my side today. I hope you loved the discussion. I would appreciate if you pen down some lines on the type of books you have at home and how they have helped to bring out the cook in you.

To come to recipe for the day, it is a very simple one; my mom cooks it as a side dish along with rice and dal.

Serves 2

Ingredients:

Okra (Bhindi): 100 gms

Potato (Alu): 100 gms or 2 medium sizes

Onion (Peyaj): 2 medium sizes

Green chili (Kacha Lanka): 2

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Sunflower oil (Saada tel): 1 tablespoon

Salt to taste

alu-bhendi-fry-ingredients

Preparation:

  • Cut the potatoes in thin long pieces of length 2 inches each
  • Similarly cut the ladies finger into halves with 2 inches length
  • Julienne the onions
  • Heat oil in a wok, and throw in the potatoes along with the onions as the oil gets heated.
  • Cook for 2-3 minutes and then add the ladies finger to it.
  • Toss the whole for a minute or two and then add half cup of water for the vegetables to get cooked properly.
  • Leave for 8 minutes more for everything to get cooked, stir for a few times and add water if required.

We used to have potato-ladies finger fry as an accompaniment with rice and dal, you can also have it with chapattis or paratha.

alu-bhendi-fry

This should be the ideal one to send for the Challenge event hosted by Veda of Iyengar’s kitchen

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Check for more updates on this blog, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

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Posted in Niramis(Vegetarian), potato, Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Baigan Bharta

Posted by Sudeshna on November 4, 2008

We’ve moved to own domain name – bengalicuisine.net. You can follow me on Twitter, visit my Flickr photostream.

Last five days I am all done with a heavy cold and extreme head aches. All of these sickness made me stay out of kitchen for these. I am speding time more on the bed than anywhere else at home. This morning when at last I thought of visiting the near by doctor, he gave me a shock. He prescribed with lots of medicine and talked about me having rhinocitis. The term reminded me of that Khaziranga National Forest rinos with a horn at the place of nose. Now, coming to the graver part, he suggested that if these problems do not get better by the next 5 days and with all these medications then it is presumably a case of sinusitis and in that case I need to a have a CT scan done. CT scan !!!! O dear Lord !!! I am an absolute claustrophobic, I can’t stay inside a lift for more than a few seconds and he was asking me to have a CT scan done, that means staying inside that whole for more than half-an hour. I was feeling worse with this news than with all of these running nose, blocked ears and head aches.

I had cooked up Baigan Bharta as a side dish for last night dinner. My brain going haywire with the news from the doctor this morning, it think it will look like a bharta and nothing less. So thought of writing this post.

The Big Fat Brinjal - ready to roast

The Big Fat Brinjal - ready to roast

Serves 4

Ingredients

Eggplant (Begun) : 1 big size

Onions (Peyaj): 3 large size, julienned

Tomato: 2 medium size, cut into squares

Green chilli (kacha Lanka): 4, cut into ringlets

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Coriander leaves(Dhaniya pata) chopped for garnishing

Salt to taste

Lemon juice (Pati lebur raus): 1 tablespoon, optional

Preparation:

  • Prick the brinjal with a fork or knife.
  • Roast the eggplant, so that it gets softened and the skin starts coming out of it.
  • Take the skin out of the eggplant, mash and  keep it aside
  • Heat oil in a wok
  • Toss in the onion. Sauté till softens
  • Add the mashed eggplant to the onions along with tomatoes, turmeric powder, chili ringlets and salt.
  • Cook till the eggplant dries, take care that it doesn’t get stick to the bottom of the wok.
  • Take out of flame and garnish with coriander leaves and lemon juice.

Baigan bharta is best tasted with roti or parantha. Though I had to roast the eggplant on a gas oven, it tastes and smells best when roasted over a charcoal oven.

Baigan Bharta

Baigan Bharta

Catch me with more updates on this blog, till then

Happy Cooking and Happy Eating

As I have not used any electrical or electronic gadgets to cook this, my post is heading for the ‘Power’ less cooking event

hosted by Simple Indian Food

powerless

This is of great joy for me to send in my post to Devon Ave: Indian-Jewish Adventure! hosted by Joelen.

Baigan Bharta goes to fight the other Eat Healthy-Fight Diabetes entries hosted by Sangeeth.

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Check for more updates on this blog, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

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Posted in Dinner, Niramis(Vegetarian), Side dish | Tagged: , , , , , , | 6 Comments »